Monday, July 13, 2015

Reina Sofia Museum


Madrid has some of the best museums in the world. The Reina Sofia Museo Nacional de Arte is definitely one of these. Under its roof is arguably one of the most intriguing paintings of all time, the Guernica by Pablo Picasso.  The canvas measures 11.45 ft. by 25 ft. It is larger than liife. And it tells a gripping story of a small town in the Basque region which was bombed by German Luftwaffe aircraft in 1937 during the Spanish Civil War.  It is forbidden to photograph this painting so here's the link to view it: http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/collection/artwork/guernica.

Girl at the Window, Salvador Dali, 1925

This is an early oil painting by Dali of his sister. I too am drawn by the view from the window when I stand in front of this painting.  What must this girl be thinking? Is she longing to go out to the beach? Dali is a master at engaging his audience. His paintings often challenge our visual perception of his art. 

The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters - Francisco Goya, 1799

This is #43 of a series of etchings called, Los Caprichos. Goya has this to say about this particular aquatint: "Imagination abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters; united with her, she is the mother of the arts and the source of their wonders." Art, therefore, is the product of reason and imagination.

Lunar Bird, Joan Miró, 1966

This bronze sculpture by Miró is in the garden of the Reina Sofia. The moon represents the female while the sun, the male. Miró is best known for his imaginative and colorful canvasses. There are a few of his paintings in the museum as well.  To see more sculptures by Miró in one place, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has an exhibition of his sculptures through October 2015.  

The Reina Sofia has thousands of artworks from the end of the 19th century to the present day in its collection.  Paintings by George Braque, Juan Gris, Jean Dubuffet, René Magritte, Robert Delauney, and a host of contemporary artists are currently on display at the museum. With such a large collection, only a thousand artworks are on view. Read more about the collection here:  http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/press/the-collection/collection-1-irruption-20th-century-utopias-and-conflicts-1900-1945.

Looking up at the glass elevator of the Reina Sofia

The nice thing about going to a museum in Madrid is that there are designated times during the day or week when the entrance fee is waived. On Sundays, the museum is free from 1:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.  Mondays through Saturdays from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.  Museum is closed on Tuesdays.  Check the museum website to verify hours and entrance fees: www.museoreinasofia.es/en.

*****

Images by TravelswithCharie



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