Sunday, September 27, 2009

"My Life is My Message" - Mahatma Gandhi


Behind the Ferry Building in San Francisco is a promenade with tremendous views of the bay. It's especially inviting on a warm day when you can sit outside and begin to relax while listening to the sound of water lapping against the pier. In the midst of this outdoor setting, there's a statue of Mahatma Gandhi. The inscription beneath his thin frame dressed only in a skimpy robe and aided by a walking stick reads:
"Non violence is the greatest force at the disposal of Mankind.
It is the supreme law. By it alone can mankind be saved."


And right below his name and vital records is this quote:
"My Life is My Message".

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Photos by Charie

The Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco


The view of the Museum from Mission Street reveals only the brick façade of the former Jesse Street Power Substation. Hidden behind the neo Gothic cathedral of St. Patrick's is the startling extension to the Museum which is in the shape of a gigantic cube designed by Daniel Libeskind. Libeskind's idea of melding distinctive architectural styles translates into the successful fusion of the old substation in the Classical Revival style and the bold and contemporary blue metallic steel cube extension.

View from Yerba Buena Lane

The museum is located at 736 Mission Street (between 3rd and 4th), San Francisco, CA 94103 . It is a short walk from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. http://www.thecjm.org/

Hours: Daily 11 AM–5 PM, Thursday 1–8 PM, Closed Wednesday.

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Photos by Charie

Saturday, September 19, 2009

"Survivor Package" in San Diego Resort Hotel




In beautiful and sunny San Diego, a four-star resort offers rooms for $19.00 a night. Great rate? There's no bed, no electricity, no toiletries included at this price. Bring your own tent and sleep on the floor. Oh, and don't forgot your flashlight and toilet paper. For more on this story click on the link below:

http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/09/11/mm-hotelamenities/

Sunday, September 06, 2009

5 Scams Tourists Always Fall For

This article from How Stuff Works says 25 million American travelers overseas were victims of these scams in 2008. Here are the scenarios:

1. Good Samaritans - scam artist is trying to help you out
2. Unscrupulous cabbies - literally cab driver takes you for a "ride"
3. Money changing "errors" - visitor unfamiliar with local currency
4. Create a distraction, steal your wallet - beware the woman who undresses
5. Fake police officers searching for counterfeit bills

It's easy to be victimized traveling abroad because every traveler is vulnerable in a new and different environment. Add jetlag to that and ecco!, an easy target. I was once a victim of a money changer in Bali who swore he didn't have larger bills to give me hence he had to count thousands of rupiah as I stood soaking in the hot and humid air while he slid his hand over the bills and pulled out $12 worth of rupiah. Thank goodness the hotel staff where I stayed in Nusa Dua helped me recover the money from the changer. And yes, he didn't have to count endlessly because as it turned out, he had larger bills to spare.

About taxis, I have yet to figure out the night and weekend surcharges, the per bag fee and the charge for calling a taxi to pick me up from the hotel or specific location vs. hailing them on the street. This is especially true in Europe. I study my guide books carefully before going on a trip so I know what to expect. But sometimes, I'm still in the dark. Public transportation is cheaper and more colorful but buying a ticket from a machine may take a few minutes to decipher. It's high tech and the language of instruction is often Greek to me.

http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/5-tourist-scams.htm

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